The view from Hoxton Press

 

View of the towers from Shoreditch Park.

Hoxton Press is a residential project located at the south-west corner of the Colville Estate, a housing development in Hackney, East London. It’s part of Hackney Council’s programme of redevelopment across the borough that calls for 2,500 new homes to be built over the coming years. Karakusuevic Carson Architects was originally commissioned to develop a masterplan, which was adopted in 2011. The two residential towers by David Chipperfield Architects, 16 and 20 storeys respectively, form part of this masterplan.

View from the top of the 20-storey tower towards East London.

The towers open up to Shoreditch Park from its North-West corner. A typical floor plan contains six apartments while the two lower levels accommodate studios and the two penthouse levels have three apartments per floor. The structural frame facilitates column-free corners and each of the 198 apartments has a corner living room and balcony offering unobstructed views. The towers are clad with handmade Belgian bricks in different colours: dark grey for the western tower, and red for the eastern one. As the site forms a link between Shoreditch Park and the Colville neighbourhood, a single surface material underlines its permeability, devoid of fixed paths or walkways. This single surface continues into the ground floor of the buildings, creating a unique seamless transition between exterior and interior, while the brick façades turn into vaulted soffits bridging the first-floor slab and the central core.

The view from the top of the highest tower is quite unique since the surrounding urban fabric is composed mainly of low-rise residential buildings and warehouses. Looking South, the panorama reveals London’s evolving skyline with both the old and the new iconic skyscrapers of the City. Looking East, the bulk of the Docklands’ financial district emerges from the flat cityscape towards the Thames estuary.

More photos of this project can be found on this page.

All photos are © Francesco Russo